Replacement windshield?

Old April 3rd, 2018, 10:06 AM
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Replacement windshield?

Put in a claim with Farmer's to have my windshield replaced in my 72 CS 2door. They put me with Safelite and I see in their email that the replacement "Your windshield is a non-Original Equipment manufactured part" which is fine if it is at least OEM style or quality.
Anyone have any experience with this and what to watch out for? Or what to make sure of ahead of time? How many repro glass options are there, just one?
I had to tell the guy on the phone that it was tinted w/antenna as he didn't even ask. And that the installer needs to come prepared with butyl tape to do it right and not just glue/caulk it in.
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Old April 4th, 2018, 07:21 AM
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specific glass

The glass folks tell me that PPG is the brand to ask for.
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Old April 4th, 2018, 07:51 AM
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There probably aren't a whole lot of manufacturers of windshields for 46 year old cars. I wouldn't worry too much about what Safelite installs in your car. They're a reputable firm, and auto glass these days has to meet stricter safety standards than were in place when your car was new. As long as it is properly installed, you should have no problems. I just had to have the windshield replaced in my '13 Frontier because of a stone-caused crack, and Safelite did it. They came out to the house and did a great job. The guy who did it was very good.

Last edited by jaunty75; April 4th, 2018 at 07:53 AM.
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Old April 4th, 2018, 09:24 AM
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Make sure you inspect the antenna lead at the bottom of the windshield, When I had have mine replaced last year due to the lovely Michigan roads the antenna lead at the of glass was broken off when it came out of the wrapper.

Last edited by mister442; April 4th, 2018 at 09:25 AM. Reason: missing word
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Old April 4th, 2018, 10:07 AM
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My other concern is that the kid that shows up will have only a glue/caulk gun and no butyl tape to correctly install it
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Old April 4th, 2018, 10:20 AM
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Well now the mgr. boob at Safelite is telling me the tech will not show up with butyl tape and due to 'liability and safety concerns' they only glue them in like all modern cars. Cancelled that install...oh and the glass was from China, brand name FYU or something..
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Old April 4th, 2018, 10:21 AM
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I can pretty much guarantee that they will use the caulk. As long as the thickness of the caulk is the same as the butyl tape (3/8"), it should be no problem, and actually give a better seal.
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Old April 4th, 2018, 10:51 AM
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I've been deciding whether I wanted to try this myself. I found this video on YouTube that shows a "proper" installation for GM cars. Uses both a foam "dam" and urethane. Not sure I'll attempt this but it's an interesting video anyways.

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Old April 4th, 2018, 11:11 AM
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I went to a shop that restored cars and got the name of a glass company that they used. It was put in with urethane sealer and the installer knew to make it a little thicker bead so that the glass still met the windshield molding. Remember the insurance company can't tell you where to take you car they can only suggest a place.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 02:09 AM
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Originally Posted by pizza442 View Post
My other concern is that the kid that shows up will have only a glue/caulk gun and no butyl tape to correctly install it
FYI, the factory installation process uses urethane from a caulking gun, as shown in the Fisher Body Manual. The butyl tape is an aftermarket product. I've installed windshields using the tape with no problems, but the factory-style urethane will do a better job of sealing against an uneven pinchweld surface.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 03:40 AM
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I would not worry to much! Had the same glass that they were going to use on yours and the caulk gun black urethane for 15 years. Had a local glass place that has done tractor and combine glass for my company for years and sent out a guy older than me to do the install.

IMHO let the pros do it.

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Old April 7th, 2018, 04:36 AM
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I had a friend at a body shop replace mine. I trusted him and know he knows how to do old cars as he has restored a few. I didn't want a kid who does new Kias usually come out and find rust around the windshield and just glob it up or something. If there was rust problems my friend would repair it at my cost. But all was good.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 08:10 AM
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I had my windshield replaced last year using a local glass shop recommended by a auto restoration shop.They sealed with caulk using a powered caulk gun to get a uniform bead. Make sure they test fit the glass before installing. The original part they brought was too small.

I would ask a lot of questions before selecting an installer to make sure they have experience with old cars.

Also note this is a good time to clean up or repaint the cowl and/ or the metal dash immediately under the windshield.

I got the dark tinted strip at the top and really like it.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 09:21 AM
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Thanks for the replies, guys! The car is at my paint/body guy's place ready for the paint booth so he is prepared to inspect it for rust when the old glass is pulled.
I guess I'm now confused about the orig install method and butyl tape being aftermarket.
When my 86 442's windshield was replaced, I noticed that it sat deeper in the frame and the chrome trim around the windshield now was not flush with the glass (there is either a gap or the trim is angled down towards the glass, I'll have to go out and look). I later attributed it to the kid simply glue'in it in. When I swapped rear glass (added heated glass) with my 72, the oldtimer used butyl tape along with some caulk around the border for good measure.
Also, I thought the reason for the butyl tape was so that the windshield could pop out and away from the car during a roll over whereas the new cars need the glass glued in since they now count on it for holding up the roof due to less steel used over the years to lighten cars up for mileage? (plus new cars have airbags between passengers and the windshield but of course my 72 doesn't and you want the glass exit away from the car and not spread a bunch of small shards/glass dust in the passenger cabin)

Last edited by pizza442; April 7th, 2018 at 09:25 AM.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 09:32 AM
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As I said, read the factory service manuals. Butyl tape was not used by GM. As far as the rollover story, I find that difficult to believe as an engineer. Frankly, any new car has a MUCH stronger roof structure than a 1960s or 70s hardtop.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 09:35 AM
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Off the dig up my manuals...one question tho: weren't cars orig designed for the glass to pop out on a roll over and how did this work if the glass was glued in?
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Old April 7th, 2018, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by pizza442 View Post
.one question tho: weren't cars orig designed for the glass to pop out on a roll over and how did this work if the glass was glued in?
News to me. Rollover safety was never a design requirement in the 1960s - how would convertibles of the time comply? Given how difficult it is to flip a 1960s American car (hint: TV and movies have to augment their stunt cars with pyrotechnics or by driving up ramps to flip over), this was not a concern. And why worry only about the windshield when the side glass isn't going to pop out in any case? And frankly, the glass is going to be the least of your problems in a rollover.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 09:47 AM
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I guess the movie Tucker left an impression! Having trouble finding windshield install...going thru assem. line manual now. Didn't find in chassis serv. manual..Can't seem to find my Fisher Body Manual..

Last edited by pizza442; April 7th, 2018 at 09:54 AM.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 10:18 AM
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Found this interesting note about a 'dam'.
Ahh, interesting reading out there:
"The fact is that GM used a dam tape and sealant produced by the Thiokol Corporation to set their stationary glass. The main purpose of the dam tape was to contain the excess squeeze-out of the sealant so that it flowed into the channel as opposed to into the passenger compartment. In doing this, they were able to have a visually pleasing aesthetic so that the squeeze out wasn’t visible when looking from outside into the window (front or rear). There was a bit of a secondary benefit of the dam which to a degree held the glass at a proper height so that the stainless trim fit well to the window. It is important to note that the dam tape used was of a reasonably low durometer and was easily deformed and so the finished height of the glass wasn’t always “fixed” by the dam tape height (as you can see in the comparison of pieces removed from the front and rear window from an original OEM-installed glass set)."

Perhaps butyl tape was the aftermarket version of the dam tape used at the factory?
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Old April 7th, 2018, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by pizza442 View Post
Perhaps butyl tape was the aftermarket version of the dam tape used at the factory?
No. The dam is simply "tooling" to contain the urethane. It has no structural properties as far as retaining the glass. The butyl tape is the only adhesive holding the glass when that is used.

Frankly, you are waaaay overthinking this. The butyl tape and the factory adhesive are equivalent for just about all instances. The butyl tape was developed as a much faster and less messy installation method, but it is less forgiving of imperfections in the pinchweld.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 10:32 AM
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More pics from this resto article:






"While the “L” or “J” profile dam tape is no longer available today, there are dam tapes available that in fact are better for the restorer should he/she decide to re-install using a Urethane system. Today’s tapes are of a higher durometer and provide a stiffness which can accurately hold the glass at the proper height for a more sure installation. Of course if the installation is going to be done with Butyl tape, then the installer need only have the proper diameter tape to set the glass to the proper height so that the stainless trim will fit tight to the glass.
It should be noted that in modern cars the stationary glass is set in a Urethane bed and no dam tape is used. The black edge or “Frit” around modern windshield has three purposes. The first is to provide a good surface for adhesion of the sealant, the second is to obscure the sealant bed so that the squeeze out cannot be seen and the final is to provide a UV barrier to protect the sealant from degrading in the sun since few cars use stainless trim today."
This article has been a wealth of info and I definately need to talk with the installer regarding what they will be doing to get the glass at proper height.

I see what you are saying Joe! I guess since I have time for this resto and I love knowledge I am trying to cover all the bases! Plus after seeing my 86 glass sitting too deep, I want to make sure the 72 is done right

Last edited by pizza442; April 7th, 2018 at 10:35 AM.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by pizza442 View Post
I see what you are saying Joe! I guess since I have time for this resto and I love knowledge I am trying to cover all the bases! Plus after seeing my 86 glass sitting too deep, I want to make sure the 72 is done right
There are two diameters of the butyl tape. Whoever put the glass in the 86 used the wrong one.
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Old April 7th, 2018, 03:04 PM
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The kid that did the 86 didn't have butyl tape, just caulk gun. I was retrieving my 86 at the impound yard 3 mos. after it was stolen from me. Gang member switched out the vin w/1981 Cutlass (don't want to give him cred. but pretty crafty). Yard wouldn't let it go with bogus vin and had a glass guy come out to pull windshield so they could get to the vin. Glass cracked so they had to install new glass. Probably didn't build up a big enough bead? New glass has leaked since that day, too
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Old April 7th, 2018, 03:18 PM
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Originally Posted by pizza442 View Post
When my 86 442's windshield was replaced, I noticed that it sat deeper in the frame and the chrome trim around the windshield now was not flush with the glass (there is either a gap or the trim is angled down towards the glass, I'll have to go out and look). I later attributed it to the kid simply glue'in it in. When I swapped rear glass (added heated glass) with my 72, the oldtimer used butyl tape along with some caulk around the border for good measure.
if they didn't get a thick enough bead of chaulk,it will set lower and the trim won't fit.and the butyl came in 5/16 and 3/8th.didn't they switch to the urethane in 73 or so.every 60's car i have ever pulled a windshield had butyl.
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