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Great Grandfather's Oldsmobile marketing

Old September 16th, 2011, 05:35 PM
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Great Grandfather's Oldsmobile marketing

In light of TK-65's post about the dealership his car came from, I figured I show you guys something my dad sent me a few months ago. Sort of cool...

"I was looking thru my Aunt Mary Naomi Alexander's stuff (she saved everything) and ran across ANOTHER Olds post card sent to your GGrandfather Hardin in 1966 (see attached). I sent you one I found a few weeks back of a 1956 Olds card sent to him (attached also). Looks like the car dealer targeted him once every 10 years. He never bought an Olds but often talked about wanting a Buick. Back then, only rich folks had Buick's and Oldsmobiles. Hardin Alexander worked for Ford Motor Company back in the late 1920's /early 1930's in Dallas, but he always owned Chevrolet's. Maybe he knew how the Fords were put together back then (HaHa). Love you, Dad"



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Old September 16th, 2011, 05:51 PM
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Nice and they didnt even charge her for the stamp, time to post, time to write it out and the card itself!! No wonder Olds went in the Toilet!! Sorry I went Miller for a moment! lol Great Items to have...
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Old September 16th, 2011, 06:28 PM
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Neat post cards... That 98 is gorgeous!
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Old September 16th, 2011, 07:07 PM
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I like the old phone number. TU 4-3201. TU for tulip.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 07:52 PM
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Yeah, what is the Tulip? Is that a Mainframe? My mother in law has run wires for AT&T for 30 years and works at Jackson Frame in Houston...that's all I could come up with is that Tulip is the frame.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 09:02 PM
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From a time gone by when you could simply address mail "City" and it would get to who it was supposed to. Try that now...

Mid-80s I sent my Aunt Tillie a birthday card in Jacksonville FL and addressed it "Jax FL". It came back undeliverable.

The TU is simply the exchange code for that city or area of it. Here it was SWiftX-XXXX, neighboring towns were KRamer and LYman. The Bells finally decided it was simpler to just use numbers.

I can remember a time on the LYman exchange when you didn't even have to dial LY7-XXXX. You just dialed the four digit number and it connected.

Salesmen's demonstrator cars are a thing of the past too, I think.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 10:11 PM
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Another thing I just noticed is that in the 10 years between post cards the dealership must've changed hands. The address and phone are the same but the dealer name is different.
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Old September 17th, 2011, 01:36 AM
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The old party lines were good for juicy gossip hehe
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Old September 17th, 2011, 04:31 AM
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Check this out:

Telephone EXchange Name Project

http://ourwebhome.com/TENP/TENproject.html


And this one. TUlip is down there under "88", of all things!

http://ourwebhome.com/TENP/Recommended.html
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Old September 17th, 2011, 06:03 AM
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Remember that the Bell System was only one of a number of competing telephone systems a hundred years ago. Many areas, especially rural areas, had systems run by smaller companies, or by "Mom and Pop" companies, with equipment supplied by Stromberg, Automatic Electric, etc. (the last one closed down just a few years ago in northern Maine - the switchboard was in the family's livingroom, and they would take turns answering and connecting people).

One of the selling points of some of the early (1890's) companies was "direct dial," where everybody had a number, and you picked up the phone and dialed it yourself.
Bell had not fully developed this system, and used that as a selling point - they offered more "personal" service: you picked up the phone and asked a real person to connect you to the party you wanted. Part of this was the minimizing of the number of numbers a person would have to remember.
In a small town, you could pick up the phone and ask for "Bill Johnson," or "Jim's Grocery," and they's put you through (one of the things that upset people when that system in Maine finally closed was that they could no longer just pick up the phone and ask for "Emma," and have the operator ring whatever number she figured Emma would be near at this time of day).
In larger cities, you needed a number, but for a long time you never needed more than four, and later five digits (where my grandparents lived in New York City, they didn't have phone dials installed until 1946). You'd pick up the phone and ask for the exchange and the number, such as "PEnnsylvania 6-5000." Initially, each exchange was unique, and represented a specific switch, but after a while, they'd get up near 10,000 numbers and have to stick a number on the end of the exchange. Some of the common exchanges in my area when I was a kid were ELgin, SAvoy, and YUkon. They would often refer to the geographic area where they were located, such as PEnnsylvania (the area near Penn Station), MUrray Hill (Murray Hill), and ATlantic (the exchange of my number in the coastal town where I live now). The exchange of a phone number conveyed information about the neighborhood or the town where the number was located.
After the introduction of direct-dial nationwide in the thirties through the fifties, the named exchanges were assigned numbers, and continued to serve as a convenient mnemonic device for millions of callers. Since the sixties, though, with direct-dial long-distance, the phone company has been emphasizing numbers-only, and when they freed up strings with a zero or a one in the middle for use as local exchanges in the eighties, that pretty much killed it.

Originally Posted by ah64pilot View Post
Yeah, what is the Tulip? Is that a Mainframe? ... that's all I could come up with is that Tulip is the frame.
A mainframe? in 1900? Ha! Good one!

- Eric
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