General Discussion Discuss your Oldsmobile or other car-related topics.

Where to get Receiver Drier reconditioned?

Old March 17th, 2017, 04:53 PM
  #1  
Auto Enthusiast
Thread Starter
 
1974IndyDelta12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 186
Where to get Receiver Drier reconditioned?

My receiver dryer sat too long when restoring the car and it need to be reconditioned to get my AC up and running again. I heard there was a company in FLA that exchanges them and has reconditioned ones in stock. Anyone that can lead me in the right direction would be most appreciated.
1974IndyDelta12345 is offline  
Old March 17th, 2017, 06:34 PM
  #2  
Registered User
 
classicmuscle.442's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Water Wonderland MI.
Posts: 1,232
All a filter drier does is absorb moisture if not in use, put it in an oven at low temp for couple hours to dry it out. When you remove it from oven seal it off to make it air tight with caps or electrical tape.
classicmuscle.442 is offline  
Old March 17th, 2017, 06:41 PM
  #3  
Registered User
 
Paladin31's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Battle Creek, Michigan
Posts: 1,948
Also, after its reinstalled you should always pull a deep vacuum on the system to not only assure a sealed system, but more importantly to dehydrate the system and remove non-condensibles.

Brett
Paladin31 is offline  
Old March 17th, 2017, 06:44 PM
  #4  
Registered User
 
66-3X2 442's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Birmingham,Alabama
Posts: 2,922
Originally Posted by classicmuscle.442 View Post
All a filter drier does is absorb moisture if not in use, put it in an oven at low temp for couple hours to dry it out. When you remove it from oven seal it off to make it air tight with caps or electrical tape.
And hope like hell it's not full of metal from a compressor explosion. Classic Auto Air in Tampa FL is an excellent rebuilder of OEM a/c parts.
66-3X2 442 is offline  
Old March 17th, 2017, 06:53 PM
  #5  
Registered User
 
Paladin31's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Battle Creek, Michigan
Posts: 1,948
True that Michael, you could always look inside with a light, I believe there should be a screen on the inlet to trap out chunks, and as such could be cleaned.
Paladin31 is offline  
Old March 17th, 2017, 06:54 PM
  #6  
Auto Enthusiast
Thread Starter
 
1974IndyDelta12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 186
The unit was working back in the day, the only thing wrong with the compressor was a bad bearing. I am amazed that getting the unit is such an easy fix, two "mechanics" told me to get it rebuilt so they can put in new desiccant bags. This fix will save lots of time & money, thanks!
1974IndyDelta12345 is offline  
Old March 17th, 2017, 07:01 PM
  #7  
Registered User
 
Junkman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Northeast Connecticut
Posts: 764
What do you mean by "sat too long"? If the drier was installed on the car, and the lines hooked up to it, so it wasn't exposed to the atmosphere, then it is good to go. When whomever does the recharge on the unit, pulls a vacuum, the lowered pressure in the system, will cause any moisture in the system to boil, and be pulled out of the system as vapor.
If your receiver drier was sitting on a shelf, capped, then it is also good to go into the system. A capped drier is good for almost an eternity as long as the caps are not removed, and it isn't sitting in a constantly changing atmospheric environment, such as a garage that is cold in the winter, and then extremely hot in the summer.
The last thing is if your receiver drier was bolted into the car, and the caps removed, but without the hoses hooked up, then the drier is "toasted". There is no way of knowing what might have crawled into the drier, or how much moisture and contamination it has been exposed to.
If you have to have your receiver drier re-built, then I suggest sending it to Classic Air 5133 W Idlewild Ave, Tampa, FL 33634 (813-251-2356). I have had them do a number of receiver driers for me in the past, and you can't tell that they have been opened and re-welded. They do excellent work. I have never found that they have re-built units on the shelf, but it is a possibility. This time of the year, they are getting busy, but in the off season, it was usually about 10 - 14 day turn around. They will also re-build any component of the old GM air conditioning system, except for the expansion valve, which isn't rebuildable. They will test your old expansion valve and let you know if it is good or bad. They can also restore the finish on them to look like new.
I believe in keeping all my air conditioning unit with R12, and I buy Delco refrigerant oil from Amazon, and get my Freon 12 at swap meets. I haven't been a fan of R134 in old original systems, since it doesn't always cool as well, and once a system is contaminated with R134 and the synthetic oils, it is next to impossible to convert them back, without a complete tear down of the system, and either cleaning and / or replacing expensive components. Today, a good refrigeration service company can pull a vacuum on the system, charge it with nitrogen and let it sit over night. If it doesn't loose the nitrogen, they vacuum it down and then install the refrigerant. If it leaks down, then you need to find the leak, and repair it. R12 or R134, the testing is the most important part of the job, to assure that the system will work properly when the heat arrives. If you haven't replaced all the "O" rings in the system, then I suggest that you do so now, before it is charged. A trick that I use to make sure that I get the proper torque on the fittings, is to draw a line across the fitting and its mating component, with a magic marker. Then when it is loosened up, I tighten it to the mark, and a smidgen more. That system of doing it, hasn't ever failed me. Also, remember to oil the "O" rings, and the threads before tightening with refrigeration oil.


PS.. I started responding, got interrupted, and when I finally posted this, I see that you have added additional information, and you have been given some good advise.


If it was a simple bearing replace, then you should be OK with a deep (48 hour vacuum) draw. While the bearing is being replaced, make sure that they replace the "diaper" that catches the oil that the shaft rides on at the ceramic seal. Here is a good write up on a Corvette forum.
http://www.corvetteforum.com/forums/...placement.html

Last edited by Junkman; March 17th, 2017 at 07:11 PM. Reason: add additional information
Junkman is offline  
Old March 17th, 2017, 07:32 PM
  #8  
Auto Enthusiast
Thread Starter
 
1974IndyDelta12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 186
I am option 3, hoses removed with no caps. Or, as you say, toast. Thanks for the info on where to get it rebuilt, I will send it there and do it right. I did buy and install a new compressor, one set up for R134. With the bad bearing I got sick of people asking me why there was no belt on the AC pulley. Thus, I added the after market compressor. I do have the original compressor, figured it best to keep it and they can keep my 10 bucks. I will be at the Oldsmobile nationals this summer, so having AC driving from Arizona to New Mexico is a necessary task to accomplish. Thanks for for your thoughtful reply, that description should be saved as a sticky for people to have access to in the future.
1974IndyDelta12345 is offline  
Old March 17th, 2017, 07:54 PM
  #9  
Registered User
 
Junkman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Northeast Connecticut
Posts: 764
Brenda, considering the collectability of your car, you might want to rethink the R134 refrigerant and compressor. If you can return the compressor, sent your original to Tampa, and they can refurbish it. Just ask them to preserve all the old labels and markings. It will be well worth it later on when you decide to sell the car. Depending on where you are in Arizona, there is a shop in Scottsdale, that specializes in old car air conditioning. If you are near there, send me a PM, and I will get you the information.


Just realized that you are in Phoenix, but I have to believe that there is someone in your area that can do a R12 repair. Good luck with whatever you decide.. Junk

Last edited by Junkman; March 17th, 2017 at 07:57 PM.
Junkman is offline  
Old March 18th, 2017, 07:31 AM
  #10  
Gary
 
VC455's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Gillespie County Texas
Posts: 645
If you send anything to Classic Air, make sure you
--Call them and tell them what you want
--Email them confirming what you want
--Put a note in the package explaining everything you want

I didn't do all three and they sent back all "new" components that don't look anything like what I sent. The insulating sleeves were apparently hacked off with a dull machete.

They didn't respond to repeated pleas for my original parts back.

From what others say, I'm sure they can do good work--you just have to make sure they are listening. Apparently it's hard for them to understand that some 50-year-old cars aren't clapped-out daily drivers.
VC455 is offline  
Old March 18th, 2017, 12:43 PM
  #11  
Registered User
 
442Fred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Scottsdale Arizona
Posts: 410
PM sent
442Fred is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Junkman
Parts Wanted
0
June 2nd, 2013 07:50 PM
russell-t
Parts For Sale
0
August 17th, 2012 10:02 AM
buickfarmer
Parts For Sale
5
December 8th, 2010 12:42 PM
amphicar770
General Questions
2
July 13th, 2010 02:57 AM


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Where to get Receiver Drier reconditioned?


Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.