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Detached Gara

Old November 23rd, 2018, 08:33 AM
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Detached Garage Wiring Questions

I just installed a 28x36 pole barn thatís about 70í away from my house and itís another 70í to my main breaker panel within my basement. I ran 2Ē schedule 40 conduit a minimum of 2í deep with a sweep at the house to an LB fitting for entry into the house. I plan to continue the 2í conduit along the wall adjacent to the finished ceiling. My main panel has plenty of capacity for a 100 amp service to the garage. The primary draw at the garage will be:

20 amp Rotary lift
20 amp welder
15 amp compressor
15 amp sewer sump

+ lighting.
I believe I need 1/0-1/0-1/0-2 aluminum
Or 1-1-1-4
THHN or THWN for the distance and required Amps

Copper is about four times more expensive than aluminum.

What are the thoughts of electricians on this board regarding my plans?

Thanks












Last edited by allyolds68; November 23rd, 2018 at 08:59 AM.
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Old November 23rd, 2018, 09:40 AM
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Well, a good electrician knows the electrical codes..... The codes are there for safety. If you consulted a qualified electrician and he told you what to do and what to use, then you should be fine. I believe that copper will carry more electricity than aluminum. Arc fault and GFCI's might be required in your area.
You obviously made an investment in the pole building. Now make an investment in the electrical. It might be a good investment to have a licensed electrician make the final power connections. If something is not right with your installation or something is wrong when its powered up, the electrician on hand can quickly diagnose it.
........Just my two cents worth
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Old November 23rd, 2018, 10:30 AM
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Single 0 for aluminum or 2ga for copper. Wire size needs to be rated for 120% minimum of your load. Since your not going over 300 ft, voltage drop is not an issue. Your conduit size is adequate.
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Old November 23rd, 2018, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by oldcutlass View Post
Single 0 for aluminum or 2ga for copper. Wire size needs to be rated for 120% minimum of your load. Since your not going over 300 ft, voltage drop is not an issue. Your conduit size is adequate.
thank you

i havenít talked to an electrician but I can research fairly well. I appreciate you reviewing it. Would you spend the extra money for copper?

also because this is underground the ground has to be shielded wire as well, correct?

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Old November 23rd, 2018, 02:19 PM
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I would pull 2 load and 1 neutral of the whatever size your using and a #8 ground. I don't know about the shielding part, have never done it here.
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Old November 23rd, 2018, 06:51 PM
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Nice Mike! Pulled the trigger just in time for the weather too. IMO I'd personally avoid aluminum. I know the price is tempting but it's not worth it. The aluminum gets brittle much faster than copper. The aluminum wires expansion rate is exponentially higher than copper. The propensity to loosen up under the lugs goes up and cause all sorts of resistance and hotspot even arching in extreme cases. Don't skimp on the sub-panel and breakers. Every time I have to repair a service or a distribution system which has aluminum I curse the installer.
You might want to recalc the additive load again in preparation for future add-ons once the wife moves you out there full time. I see a working fluid fridge, big screen, sound, heat and AC in the future? Run a spare schedule 40 out there for PEX piping....Like how Im spending your money...hehe. Stay warm...Steve
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Old November 23rd, 2018, 08:54 PM
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If installed correctly the metal conduit can be used as the ground, just bond a ground wire to the metal junction boxes. National electric code, local codes may be different.
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Old November 23rd, 2018, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by droldsmorland View Post
Nice Mike! Pulled the trigger just in time for the weather too. IMO I'd personally avoid aluminum. I know the price is tempting but it's not worth it. The aluminum gets brittle much faster than copper. The aluminum wires expansion rate is exponentially higher than copper. The propensity to loosen up under the lugs goes up and cause all sorts of resistance and hotspot even arching in extreme cases. Don't skimp on the sub-panel and breakers. Every time I have to repair a service or a distribution system which has aluminum I curse the installer.
You might want to recalc the additive load again in preparation for future add-ons once the wife moves you out there full time. I see a working fluid fridge, big screen, sound, heat and AC in the future? Run a spare schedule 40 out there for PEX piping....Like how Im spending your money...hehe. Stay warm...Steve
I would use the copper, myself. And future loads such as heat and A/C are realistic additions that should be a consideration now. A gas line for winter heat is not such a crazy idea, either. Its an investment that won't hurt resale value.


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Old November 23rd, 2018, 10:15 PM
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trench

You may have already thought about this. If your local codes allows running a second smaller conduit in the same trench, then you may want to consider running 2 shielded CAT5 or better Ethernet cables. One for router extender and one for a camera.
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