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Correct products and prep steps to use on buffing lacquer?

Correct products and prep steps to use on buffing lacquer?

Old July 15th, 2016, 09:32 AM
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Correct products and prep steps to use on buffing lacquer?

Time for some detailing now that I have time.
1990 applied lacquer paint. Paints in excellent shape, zero oxidation as its under a cover in the climate controlled garage since 1990. I want to do a light rub, clay bar clean, maybe wax remover too, then wax then swirl remover. Sound about right?

Havent done this in 15 years. I know there are improved simpler to use products out there but 99% are for clear coat.
What are you lacquer guys using...if there's any of ya left. And do these prep steps sound relevant?

Used to use black beauty, 3M swirl remover, a light synthetic cut to rub then straight carnauba with a final coat of vitreous glaze. Way too many steps but if thats what it takes....
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Old July 15th, 2016, 12:01 PM
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Tread lightly with what ever you decide to use lacquer burns fairly quick. I use a air powered da style buffer with a 6in foam pad. The foam pads for the big buffers are supposed to be good. Strip the existing wax and start from scratch.
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Old October 28th, 2016, 04:31 AM
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I have several buffers. a high RPM Sears, and HD low RPM Milwaukee and a B&D polisher. For your job, you could do it by hand, if you have the stamina, or the B&D dual action is a nice light duty machine which will not burn. I got a set of foam pads and very light compounds, finer than toothpaste. I think that would be the ticket. Stay away from crowns at all costs!
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Old October 28th, 2016, 05:21 AM
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I got some products from Chemical Guys on-line that are great. I've also heard good things about the pads and chemicals sold at Harbor Freight.
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Old October 31st, 2016, 03:20 AM
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[QUOTE=droldsmorland;936205]I want to do a light rub, clay bar clean, maybe wax remover too, then wax then swirl remover. Sound about right?

QUOTE]
You've got the steps mixed up a bit. Start with cleaning, then go from the more aggressive polishing compound to the least.
Today, there are so many products, in many, many more forms, and levels of polishing than back in the old lacquer days. But most are still applicable to working with lacquer.
Lacquer finishes tend to be thinner, and more fragile than today's paints, so you need to be more careful when taking on a true polishing job. To bring a finish back to life, I prefer to use the least aggressive method that does the trick.
If just wax does not do the job, use a glaze or swirl remover first. Doing it by hand is always less aggressive than by a Dual Action buffer. A rotary buffer is even more aggressive. so you can even vary the amount of action done by the method you use to apply it.
If a swirl remover doesn't bring the paint back to life, try buffing with a fine liquid polish, like Meguire's # 2 or 3. Again, if by hand doesn't do it, maybe using it with a buffer will.
If that doesn't do it, you'll have to resort to an abrasive type polish, or compound. A micro-fine compound on a lambswool, or foam pad will be the least aggressive abrasive polish. If that doesn't do it, you have to go to a regular cutting compound, or even more, a light wet-sanding with 1500 or 1000 grit paper.
The trick is to go back "up the ladder" from whatever step you need to get the paint shiny, to make it finer and finer.
So, if you 1500 grit sand it, you need to compound it next, then liquid polish, then swirl remover, or glaze, and wax last to preserve the new finish.
Clay, I consider a cleaning product, so I don't include it in the process, washing and clay bar should be done before any polishing.
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