ClassicOldsmobile.com  

Go Back   ClassicOldsmobile.com > General > General Discussion
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?
Search
General Discussion Discuss your Oldsmobile or other car-related topics.

Welcome to Classic Oldsmobile Forum!
Welcome to Classic Oldsmobile forum,

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, at no cost, you will have access to start new topics, reply to conversations, privately message other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, join Classic Oldsmobile Forum today!


Reply
 
 
 
submit to reddit
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old February 22nd, 2011, 09:14 AM   #1
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 408
preserving tires when car not used ?

Have an almost new set of BFGs on a car that I haven't driven in a year and may not drive this year either. Car is covered in garage.

Will the tires go bad just sitting there ? Or should I put the car on blocks ?

Take wheels off altogether and stack on their sides ?
VikingBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 22nd, 2011, 09:24 AM   #2
'87 Delta 88 Royale
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Margate, England
Posts: 1,224
Put the car on blocks so the tires are clear of the ground and cover them to keep daylight off them as well, UV light is a killer for rubber.
Check the pressures when you put the car back on the ground, and go round with a grease gun as well.
rustyroger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 22nd, 2011, 01:56 PM   #3
Got wood? I do! (an '89)
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Southeast Michigan
Posts: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by VikingBlue View Post
Have an almost new set of BFGs on a car that I haven't driven in a year and may not drive this year either. Car is covered in garage.

Will the tires go bad just sitting there ? Or should I put the car on blocks ?

Take wheels off altogether and stack on their sides ?
If you have the ability to do so, put the car on jack stands (at the jacking points, of course, NOT on any part of the suspension--a more common mistake than it should be) with the tires not touching the ground.

This does several things: It keeps your tires from "flat-spotting" on the bottom with disuse; It saves your sidewalls from being "rubbed out" (as you stack, jostle and unstack them) or discolored where the sidewall rubber touches rubber vs. the air; and, best of all, it keeps the tires safely out of the way.

Nitrogen refilling has become popular, and some say that helps as well, though with modern radial tires formulated as they are for decades of hard use with "just air," I can't vouch for it myself.

REGARDLESS, I CAN vouch for the perils of improper storage methods for the rest of the car. I would have been more than happy to buy new tires for some cars I ended up having to overhaul thanks to gummy gasoline, powdered hoses, intrusive water vapor...
__________________
No matter what new vehicle arrives for me to review, the car my kids want to see at the curb when I pick them up from school is "Angie", my '89 Custom Cruiser. It's hard to tell who is more jealous, their classmates or other parents...



"Angie" 1989 Olds Custom Cruiser wagon, 180,000 miles
"Amy" 1981 Volvo 245 DL wagon 1,414,000 miles [no typo]
auto_editor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 22nd, 2011, 02:00 PM   #4
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 628
That will help some, but even that will not keep them from getting old. I had a set of T/A s on my 70. They had less than 5 thousand miles on them, but they were olds.I looked close at them one day, and they were full of cracks. When I bought new ones, the tire store said they were in bad shape, not safe to drive on.
442Harv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2011, 05:59 AM   #5
Moderator
 
Lady72nRob71's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Plano, TX
Posts: 11,548
At the very LEAST, keep them inflated to around 35PSI to help reduce flat spots.
Keeping away from the sun's UV rays is a good idea also. Of course it will depend how well the tires were made as to how long they will really last.
All 4 of my 2 year old michelins on the Caddy are full of cracks on both sides of the tires. VERY poor quality...
__________________
-Rob Young


1972 Cutlass Supreme Convertible- (442 clone) -"Lady" (My mistress...)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/robsalbum/sets/
Lady's interior makeover Rally Pac stuff
Front end job Underhood resto
1986 Cutlass Supreme Coupe - "Pristine"
1978 Ford Pinto (Old Faithful) a.k.a. "the Tramp" - in the family since new.
1997 Cadillac STS
1999 Harley-Davidson Sportster - "the Freedom Machine"
Lady72nRob71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2011, 12:10 PM   #6
Registered User
 
dmcianfa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: WHERE THE ACTION IS!!!
Posts: 154
OK, here's the deal with tires on your car that's being stored.

Take them off and put your car on stands like the first gentlemen said. Secondly, let the air out of each tire completely. Third, do not stack them on each other as the rubber particles will migrate onto your white letterring if you have raised letters. Finally, do keep them covered with a tarp that blocks any sunlight or store them in a shed that doesnt see any light. UV will break down rubber molecules with time. Cold climates for long periods of time will also adversely affect the tire strength by changing the crystallinity over time, but I'm not as worried about that as I am with the UV and release of pressure.

Letting the air out reduces stress on the tire and adds longevity. Keeping constant pressure in the tire fatigues it with time and will begin to add undue amounts of stress and strain to the rubber molecules, which in turn will cause "cracking" and failure at a shorter life span. Granted, it takes a good amount of time to do so, but for what I pay for tires I'm not going to risk it for the amount of work it takes to do this.

Oh, by the way, Nitrogen filled tires are a complete falsehood and total gimmick one should never pay for. Your everyday air that is normally used in composed of 18-20% oxygen and the rest nitrogen with roughly 1% inert gases. The only thing it "may" do is keep your steel wheels from corroding from the inside out more, which I really never tend to see happen being that most shop air is lubricated anyway and we will never have our car long enough to promote that type of corrosion anyway under the pressure it sees. Yes, nitogen particles may be slightly larger than oxygen, but with the size of leaks that develop in a tire, its deemed as negligable as they will both escape at the same rate. Were talking about molecular levels here. That's coming from a geeky engineer I guess, but it is what it is.
__________________
-Dom


Look to Olds for the New!


Last edited by dmcianfa; February 23rd, 2011 at 12:27 PM.
dmcianfa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2011, 06:14 PM   #7
Registered User
 
442much's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Sherwood Park, Alberta
Posts: 2,583
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmcianfa View Post
OK, here's the deal with tires on your car that's being stored.

Take them off and put your car on stands like the first gentlemen said. Secondly, let the air out of each tire completely. Third, do not stack them on each other as the rubber particles will migrate onto your white letterring if you have raised letters. Finally, do keep them covered with a tarp that blocks any sunlight or store them in a shed that doesnt see any light. UV will break down rubber molecules with time. Cold climates for long periods of time will also adversely affect the tire strength by changing the crystallinity over time, but I'm not as worried about that as I am with the UV and release of pressure.

Letting the air out reduces stress on the tire and adds longevity. Keeping constant pressure in the tire fatigues it with time and will begin to add undue amounts of stress and strain to the rubber molecules, which in turn will cause "cracking" and failure at a shorter life span. Granted, it takes a good amount of time to do so, but for what I pay for tires I'm not going to risk it for the amount of work it takes to do this.

Oh, by the way, Nitrogen filled tires are a complete falsehood and total gimmick one should never pay for. Your everyday air that is normally used in composed of 18-20% oxygen and the rest nitrogen with roughly 1% inert gases. The only thing it "may" do is keep your steel wheels from corroding from the inside out more, which I really never tend to see happen being that most shop air is lubricated anyway and we will never have our car long enough to promote that type of corrosion anyway under the pressure it sees. Yes, nitogen particles may be slightly larger than oxygen, but with the size of leaks that develop in a tire, its deemed as negligable as they will both escape at the same rate. Were talking about molecular levels here. That's coming from a geeky engineer I guess, but it is what it is.

I agree with all above....except for putting thje car on stands making it unmovable. I'd put junkyard tires on it and if I had to get the car out in a hurry (fire?), I could throw it in neutral and push it out. This beats knowing that there is nothng you can do to save it if it's on stands. And if this happens and you save it, you at least have something to put the tires on.
__________________
Ken
www.oldsclub.ca

2003 Oldsmobile Aurora /4.0 V8

2001 Oldsmobile Aurora / 3.5 V6

1976 Oldsmobile 442 / 455 V8

http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2057807

http://v8cars.hu/73-77cutlassregistr...=4664fd557339a

<img src=http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v417/vttedrm/LindaVaughn_1976H-O.jpg border=0 alt= />
442much is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2011, 11:21 AM   #8
Registered User
 
dmcianfa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: WHERE THE ACTION IS!!!
Posts: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by 442much View Post
I agree with all above....except for putting thje car on stands making it unmovable. I'd put junkyard tires on it and if I had to get the car out in a hurry (fire?), I could throw it in neutral and push it out. This beats knowing that there is nothng you can do to save it if it's on stands. And if this happens and you save it, you at least have something to put the tires on.
A very good thought. Never crossed my mind and definetely changes my mind about leaving it on stands throughout the winter. Thanks.
__________________
-Dom


Look to Olds for the New!

dmcianfa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2011, 11:38 AM   #9
car guy
 
gearheads78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Dallas TX
Posts: 5,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmcianfa View Post
A very good thought. Never crossed my mind and definetely changes my mind about leaving it on stands throughout the winter. Thanks.

I agree 100% that is a great idea and I have never thought about.

As for nitrogen filling...well is the best thing you could ever do. Just ask the guys that try to sell us a $10,000 fill station monthly.
__________________
-Richard "If I only had the time, talent and money to build everything in my head....."

66 Cutlass built and gone to new owner
54' 2dr HT future badass






6-25-2010 RIP Chloe Rene Daddy loves you always
gearheads78 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2011, 05:27 PM   #10
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Near Muskegon Michigan
Posts: 953
I was told by my local tire guy, that modern radial tires don't flat spot like earlier nylon. Not a problem to store for the winter.
?????? However, my old 4x4 truck with the nylons used to just thump down the road in winter after just one night!
__________________
ziff396 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2011, 06:13 PM   #11
car guy
 
gearheads78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Dallas TX
Posts: 5,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziff396 View Post
I was told by my local tire guy, that modern radial tires don't flat spot like earlier nylon. Not a problem to store for the winter.
?????? However, my old 4x4 truck with the nylons used to just thump down the road in winter after just one night!
Maybe not as bad but it still happens. We recently took in a 2008 Lexus LS460 that was owned by an elderly lady that got sick shortly after buying it. The car just sat and she finally passed away. We bought the car from the family with a couple hundred miles but over 1 year sitting in her garage. We sold it to a new owner and kept getting complaints about a vibration. We got them to wait several thousand miles hoping they would round back up. after multiple balance jobs and customer complains they finally bought them a new set of tires. Vibration instantly gone.
__________________
-Richard "If I only had the time, talent and money to build everything in my head....."

66 Cutlass built and gone to new owner
54' 2dr HT future badass






6-25-2010 RIP Chloe Rene Daddy loves you always
gearheads78 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2011, 07:36 PM   #12
GM Enthusiast
 
OLD SKL 69's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 3,620
darrellingold@gmail.com
Lots of good advice here on this issue. As far as flat spotting goes, to me it seems that certain tires seem to be more resistant to it than others. I had a set of General wide white wall tires I bought new in 1990 and put on my Riviera. If the car sat 4 days or 4 months, they never flat spotted. When they finally went, I replaced them with a set from Universal tire. These tires will flat spot if the car sits for more than a week. I have to drive it about 10 miles or so before it goes away. I spoke to Universal, and they told me it was normal. Normal? Not to me.
__________________


Darrell

1971 Cutlass Supreme, 46k original miles
1963 Buick Riviera, owned since '86, 89k org miles
1985 Buick Riviera Convertible (307 Olds)
2011 Dodge Ram QC 4x4 Hemi
OLD SKL 69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2011, 06:59 AM   #13
Registered User
 
dc2x4drvr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,528
I also just replaced 2 T/A radials with less than 5k on them, cause they were almost 10 yrs. old. Check your tire date codes, they may look good, but chances of a failure get higher on old tires. most tire mfg's are recommending tires be replaced after 8 yrs.
__________________
"She's got a big Oldsmobile"-Delbert McClinton
North Texas Olds Club, OCA # 030068
'71 442, LGT700- 5 speed ,A/C,461ci, Centerforce DF clutch, 15x8's,ARH Headers, 800 Quadrajet, "Jet Noise-The Sound of Freedom"
dc2x4drvr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2011, 06:59 AM
ClassicOldsmobile
1957 Oldsmobile




Paid Advertisement
 
 
 
submit to reddit
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
83-84 Hurst wheels and Goodyear tires from an 11M mile car mnhurst Parts For Sale 0 December 1st, 2010 09:36 AM
Best Tires? wolfman98 General Discussion 2 May 12th, 2010 06:58 AM
What Tires do you like? coltsneckbob General Discussion 3 April 10th, 2010 10:42 AM
Tires mcutlass1969 General Discussion 0 June 8th, 2009 09:37 AM
Tires tpkj Other 0 January 22nd, 2005 12:25 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:05 PM.


Advertising - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Jobs
All content Copyright 2008 by Internet Brands, Inc.

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62